JMIR Aging

Using technological innovations and data science to inform and improve health care services and health outcomes for older adults.

Editor-in-Chief:

Yun Jiang, PhD, MS, RN, FAMIA, University of Michigan School of Nursing, USA; and Jinjiao Wang, PhD, RN, MPhil, University of Rochester, USA


Impact Factor 4.9

JMIR Aging is an open-access journal that focuses on digital health, emerging technologies, health informatics applications, and patient education for preventative care, clinical care, home care, and self-management support for older adults. The journal also covers aging-focused big data analytics using data from electronic health record systems, health insurance databases, federal reimbursement databases (e.g. U.S. Medicare and Medicaid), and other large datasets.

The target audience of JMIR Aging includes physicians, nurses, allied health professionals, advanced clinical practitioners, patients and caregivers. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and technology reviews). In 2023, JMIR Aging received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 4.9 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). JMIR Aging is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, Sherpa/Romeo, DOAJ, Scopus, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

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Internet Access and Digital Technology Use in an Elderly Population

Digital technology is a social determinant of health that affects older people’s ability to engage in health maintenance and disease prevention activities; connect with family and friends; and, more generally, age in place. Unfortunately, disparities in technology adoption and use exist among older adults compared with other age groups and are even greater among low-income older adults.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

The COVID-19 pandemic has catalyzed a move from face-to-face to digital delivery of services by hospitals and primary care. However, little is known about the impact of digital transformation on organizations supporting unpaid caregivers. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the value of care provided by such informal caregivers is estimated to be £111 billion (US$ 152.7 billion) in England.

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Aging with Chronic Disease

Globally, cancer predominates in adults aged older than 60 years, and 70% of older adults have ≥1 chronic condition. Cancer self-management interventions can improve symptom management and confidence, but few interventions target the complex needs of older adults with cancer and multimorbidity. Despite growing evidence of digital health tools in cancer care, there is a paucity of theoretically grounded digital self-management supports for older adults. Many apps for older adults have not been co-designed with older adults to ensure that they are tailored to their specific needs, which would increase usability and uptake.

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AI in Older Adult Care

AI such as ChatGPT holds great promise to improve dementia patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life by providing high-quality responses to their questions about typical dementia behaviors. So far, however, evidence on the quality of such ChatGPT responses is limited. A few recent publications have investigated the quality of ChatGPT responses in other health conditions, however, our study is the first that used real-world questions asked by dementia caregivers themselves.

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Mobile Devices and Apps for Seniors and Healthy Aging

Advance care planning (ACP) is a process that involves patients expressing their personal goals, values, and future medical care preferences. Mobile applications may help facilitate this process though their use in older adults has been understudied.

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Internet Access and Digital Technology Use in an Elderly Population

Informal caregivers are called upon to provide substantial care, but more needs to be known about technology use among older adults and caregiver dyads.

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Social Media in Aging

Over the last decade, many organizations aimed at serving the needs and interests of older adults have turned to social media platforms such as Twitter to improve the visibility of age-related issues. However, notwithstanding their growing presence and participation online, minimal attention has been paid to the use of social media among these advocacy groups. To achieve policy change, advocacy organizations must first be able to engage and mobilize audiences.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

Informal caregivers (IC) play an important role in the community as health care providers for people who are dependent on self-care. Health literacy contributes to empowerment, better care, and self-management of one’s own health and can be developed using digital technologies.

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Frailty Detection, Assessment and Prediction

The rise in life expectancy is associated with an increase in long-term and gradual cognitive decline. Treatment effectiveness is enhanced at the early stage of the disease. Therefore, there is a need to find low-cost and ecological solutions for mass screening of community-dwelling older adults.

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Internet Access and Digital Technology Use in an Elderly Population

Older adults worldwide experienced heightened risks of depression, anxiety, loneliness, and poor mental well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. During this period, digital technology emerged as a means to mitigate social isolation and enhance social connectedness among older adults. However, older adults’ behaviors and attitudes toward the adoption and use of digital technology are heterogeneous and shaped by factors such as age, income, and education. Few empirical studies have examined how older adults experiencing social and economic disadvantages perceive the learning of digital tools.

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Health Services Research and Health Care Utilization in Older Patients

The occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic demanded fast changes in the delivery of healthcare. As a result, a significant growth in the use of telemedicine services occurred. Research, especially from nationally representative German samples, is needed to better understand determinants of telemedicine utilization.

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