JMIR Aging

Using technological innovations and data science to inform and improve health care services and health outcomes for older adults

Editor-in-Chief:

Yun Jiang, Ph.D., MS, RN, FAMIA, University of Michigan School of Nursing and Jinjiao Wang, Ph.D., RN, MPhil, University of Rochester


Impact Factor 4.9

JMIR Aging is an open-access journal that focuses on digital health, emerging technologies, health informatics applications, and patient education for preventative care, clinical care, home care, and self-management support for older adults. The journal also covers aging-focused big data analytics using data from electronic health record systems, health insurance databases, federal reimbursement databases (e.g. U.S. Medicare and Medicaid), and other large datasets.

The target audience of JMIR Aging includes physicians, nurses, allied health professionals, advanced clinical practitioners, patients and caregivers. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and technology reviews). In 2023, JMIR Aging received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 4.9 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). JMIR Aging is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINEDOAJ, Scopus, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

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Social Media in Aging

Social media platforms have been effective in raising awareness of the underassessment and undertreatment of pain in dementia.

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Usability and Technology Use Studies with Elder Subjects

Telehealth provides opportunities for older adults to access health care. However, limited research exists on the use of telehealth within aged care services, particularly regarding physiotherapy-led fall prevention and mobility programs. Understanding the experiences and interactions of older adults, physiotherapists, and aged care service providers is crucial for the scale-up and sustainability of such essential programs. The TOP UP study, a hybrid type 1 effectiveness-implementation randomized controlled trial in aged care, used a supported multidisciplinary telephysiotherapy model to motivate older adults to engage in exercises to improve mobility and reduce falls.

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Preventing Social Isolation and Fostering Social Interactions in Old Age

Intergenerational friendship, a mechanism of social support, is an effective intervention to reduce the increasing risk of social isolation (SI) and develop companionship in the older adult population. The COVID-19 pandemic provided a unique opportunity to examine the psychosocial intervention of befriending via technology use as a primary form of contactless socialization.

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Reviews on Aging

Implementing technology-based counseling as a complex intervention in dementia care poses challenges such as adaptation to stakeholders’ needs and limited resources. While studies have examined the effectiveness of technology-based counseling, its successful implementation remains largely unexplored.

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Usability and Technology Use Studies with Elder Subjects

The 3-minute Diagnostic Interview for CAM-Defined Delirium (3D-CAM) is an instrument specially developed for the assessment of delirium in the general wards, with identified high sensitivity and specificity. However, the use of the 3D-CAM by bedside nurses in routine practice showed relatively poor usability with multiple human errors during assessment.

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AI in Older Adult Care

Reminiscence, a therapy that uses stimulating materials such as old photos and videos to stimulate long-term memory, can improve the emotional well-being and life satisfaction of older adults, including those who are cognitively intact. However, providing personalized reminiscence therapy can be challenging for caregivers and family members.

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Aging in Place

It is a contemporary and global challenge that the increasing number of older people requiring care will surpass the available caregivers. Solutions are needed to help older people maintain their health, prevent disability, and delay or avoid dependency on others. Technology can enable older people to age in place while maintaining their dignity and quality of life. Literature reviews on this topic have become important tools for researchers, practitioners, policy makers, and decision makers who need to navigate and access the extensive available evidence. Due to the large number and diversity of existing reviews, there is a need for a review of reviews that provides an overview of the range and characteristics of the evidence on technology for aging in place.

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Usability and Technology Use Studies with Elder Subjects

Community-based social participation has shown promise in delaying cognitive decline in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who are at risk of developing dementia. Although group storytelling interventions have proven effective, the need for a skilled workforce to support people with MCI can limit broader community implementation. Technology-based interventions may offer a solution to this limitation by replicating the abilities of therapists.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

 In the United States, Latino caregivers of individuals with dementia face unique challenges and an elevated risk of adverse health outcomes. Despite the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer disease and related dementias among Latino adults, few evidence-based interventions are tailored to their cultural context. To address this gap, we examined the cultural adaptations required for the STAR caregivers (STAR-C) virtual intervention, an evidence-based intervention that educates family caregivers to manage behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. While STAR-C has shown effectiveness, neither the original in-person nor the virtual intervention considered the distinct experiences of Latino caregivers, who often bring culturally significant values into caregiving interactions.

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New Services for the Elderly

Telemedicine is a potential option for caring for older adults with multimorbidity. There is a need to explore the perceptions about telemedicine among older adults with multimorbidity to tailor it to the needs of older adults with multiple chronic conditions.

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Usability and Technology Use Studies with Elder Subjects

The Apple Watch is not a medical device per se; it is a smart wearable device that is increasingly being used for health monitoring. Evidence exists that the Apple Watch Series 6 can reliably measure blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease under controlled circumstances.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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