JMIR Aging

Digital health technologies, apps, and informatics for patient education, medicine and nursing, preventative interventions, and clinical care / home care for elderly populations

Editor-in-Chief:

Jing Wang, Professor and Vice Dean for Research, Hugh Roy Cullen Professor, UT Health San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, TX, USA


JMIR Aging (JA, Founding Editor-in-chief: Jing Wang, Professor and Vice Dean for Research, Hugh Roy Cullen Professor, UT Health San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, TX, USA) is an open access journal, focusing on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics applications and patient education for medicine and nursing, education, preventative interventions and clinical care / home care for elderly populations. In addition, aging-focused big data analytics using data from electronic health record systems, health insurance databases, federal reimbursement databases (e.g. U.S. Medicare and Medicaid), and other large databases are also welcome. 

This journal is read by clinicians, nurses/allied health professionals, informal caregivers and patients alike and have (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

JMIR Aging is indexed in PubMed Central (PMC), PubMed, and Scopus. Upon acceptance, an article processing fee will apply.

Be a founding author of this new journal and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Usability and Technology Use Studies with Elder Subjects

Smartwatches enable physicians to monitor symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis, their behavior, and their environment. Older adults experience fluctuations in their pain and related symptoms (mood, fatigue, and sleep quality) that smartwatches are ideally suited to capture remotely in a convenient manner.

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Viewpoints, Perspectives, Ideas on Aging

A disproportionate number of COVID-19 cases affect older, minority populations. Obese older adults are at higher risk of developing severe COVID-19 complications and lower survival rates, and minority older adults often experience higher rates of obesity. A plant-based diet intervention may improve COVID-19-related modifiable risk factors for obesity. Encouraging the consumption of plant-based diets comprising vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, seeds, and nuts by utilizing community outreach strategies and digital technology can contribute to improving COVID-19 risk factors among this population.

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Reviews on Aging

Falling is one of the most common and serious age-related issues, and falls can significantly impair the quality of life of older adults. Approximately one-third of people over 65 experience a fall annually. Previous research has shown that physical exercise could help reduce falls among older adults and improve their health. However, older adults often find it challenging to follow and adhere to physical exercise programs. Interventions using mixed reality (MR) technology could help address these issues. MR combines artificial augmented computer-generated elements with the real world. It has frequently been used for training and rehabilitation purposes.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

Many informal caregivers of older adults have limited time because of the number of responsibilities that their caregiving role entails. This population often experiences high levels of burden due to the stressful nature of their work and are vulnerable to developing negative psychological health outcomes. Easily accessible and flexible knowledge interventions are needed to alleviate the burden and stress experienced by this group.

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Mobile Devices and Apps for Seniors and Healthy Aging

In academic research contexts, eHealth interventions for caregivers of people with dementia have shown ample evidence of effectiveness. However, they are rarely implemented in practice, and much can be learned from their counterparts (commercial, governmental, or other origins) that are already being used in practice.

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Internet Access and Digital Technology Use in an Elderly Population

Older people’s use of the internet is increasingly coming into focus with the demographic changes of a growing older population. Research reports several benefits of older people’s internet use and highlights problems such as various forms of inequality in use within the group. There is a need for consistent measurements to follow the development and use of the internet in this group and to be able to compare groups both within and between countries, as well as follow the changes over time.

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Internet Access and Digital Technology Use in an Elderly Population

Previous work documented the beneficial association between internet use and improved cognition, functional capacity, and less cognitive decline among people in late adulthood. This work focused on potential mechanisms of such an association: knowledge on Alzheimer disease (AD) and preventive behaviors related to AD.

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Preventing Social Isolation and Fostering Social Interactions in Old Age

Technology use has become the most critical approach to maintaining social connectedness during the COVID-19 pandemic. Older adults (aged >65 years) are perceived as the most physiologically susceptible population to developing COVID-19 and are at risk of secondary mental health challenges related to the social isolation that has been imposed by virus containment strategies. To mitigate concerns regarding sampling bias, we analyzed a random sample of older adults to understand the uptake and acceptance of technologies that support socialization during the pandemic.

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Falls Prevention in the Elderly

Falls in older people commonly occur at home. Home assessment and modification (HAM) interventions can be effective in reducing falls; however, there are some concerns over the validity of evaluation findings. Routinely collected data could improve the quality of HAM evaluations and strengthen their evidence base.

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Usability and Technology Use Studies with Elder Subjects

As the global population ages, there is increased interest in developing strategies to promote health and well-being in later life, thus enabling continued productivity, social engagement, and independence. As older adults use technologies with greater frequency, proficiency, and confidence, health information technologies (HITs) now hold considerable potential as a means to enable broader access to tools and services for the purposes of screening, treatment, monitoring, and ongoing maintenance of health for this group. The InnoWell Platform is a digital tool co-designed with lived experience to facilitate better outcomes by enabling access to a comprehensive multidimensional assessment, the results of which are provided in real time to enable consumers to make informed decisions about clinical and nonclinical care options independently or in collaboration with a health professional.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

People with Alzheimer disease and related dementias often display disruptive behaviors (eg, aggression, wandering, and restlessness), which increase family caregivers’ burden of care. However, there are few tools currently available to help these caregivers manage disruptive behaviors. Mobile apps could meet this need, but to date little is known about them.

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