JMIR Aging

Editor-in-Chief:

Jing Wang, Professor and Vice Dean for Research, Hugh Roy Cullen Professor, UT Health San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, TX, USA


JMIR Aging (JA, Founding Editor-in-chief: Jing Wang, Professor and Vice Dean for Research, Hugh Roy Cullen Professor, UT Health San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, TX, USA) is an open access journal, focusing on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics applications and patient education for medicine and nursing, educationtheme, preventative interventions and clinical care / home care for elderly populations. In addition, aging-focused big data analytics using data from electronic health record systems, health insurance databases, federal reimbursement databases (e.g. U.S. Medicare and Medicaid), and other large databases are also welcome.

This journal is read by clinicians, nurses/allied health professionals, informal caregivers and patients alike and have (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

Articles are carefully copyedited and XML-tagged, ready for submission in PubMed Central. The journal is indexed in PMC and PubMed. Upon acceptance, an article processing fee will apply.

Be a founding author of this new journal and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Aging in Place

Aging of the global population is slowly paving the way for new markets for care products and services. The desire of older people to maintain their independence while remaining at home is boosting the development of ambient assisted living (AAL) solutions. Lack of user awareness of AAL solutions paired with an insufficient use of user-centered and participatory design approaches in the development of these products has hindered the uptake of these solutions by end users.

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Frailty Detection, Assessment and Prediction

Critical illness has been suggested as a sentinel event for frailty development in at-risk older adults. Frail critical illness survivors are affected by increased adverse health outcomes, but monitoring the recovery after intensive care unit (ICU) discharge is challenging. Clinicians and funders of health care systems envision an increased role of wearable devices in monitoring clinically relevant measures, as sensor technology is advancing rapidly. The use of wearable devices has also generated great interest among older patients, and they are the fastest growing group of consumer-grade wearable device users. Recent research studies indicate that consumer-grade wearable devices offer the possibility of measuring frailty.

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Mobile Devices and Apps for Seniors and Healthy Aging

Through the increasingly aging population, the health care system is confronted with various challenges such as expanding health care costs. To manage these challenges, mobile apps may represent a cost-effective and low-threshold approach to support older adults.

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Internet Access and Digital Technology Use in an Elderly Population

The worldwide spread of digitalization has led to the harnessing of technology to improve health outcomes. Paying attention to older adults’ social needs via social media is one way to promote healthy aging. Although 56% of older adults are smartphone users, little is known about their use patterns of social media.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are associated with increased stress, burden, and depression among family caregivers of people with dementia. STAR-Caregivers Virtual Training and Follow-up (STAR-VTF) is adapted from an evidence-based, in-person program that trains family caregivers to manage BPSD. We used a human-centered design approach to obtain feedback from family caregivers about STAR-VTF. The program will be evaluated using a pragmatic randomized trial.

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Internet Access and Digital Technology Use in an Elderly Population

Cancer is a disease that predominantly affects older adults, and several organizations recommend the completion of a geriatric assessment to help with cancer treatment decision-making. Owing to a shortage of geriatric teams and the vast number of older adults diagnosed with cancer each year, a web-based geriatric assessment may improve access to geriatric assessment for older adults. We systematically reviewed the literature to obtain the latest evidence for the design of our web-based geriatric assessment tool Comprehensive Health Assessment for My Plan.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

Very few evidence-based eHealth interventions for caregivers of people with dementia are implemented into practice. Municipalities are one promising context in which to implement these interventions due to their available policy and innovation incentives regarding (dementia) caregiving and prevention. In this study, two evidence-based eHealth interventions for caregivers of people with dementia (Partner in Balance and Myinlife) were implemented in 8 municipalities in the Euregion Meuse-Rhine. Partner in Balance is a blended care, 8-week, self-management intervention intervention designed to aid caregivers of people with dementia in adapting to their new roles that is delivered through coaches in participating health care organizations who are trained to use it to offer online support to their clients. Myinlife is an eHealth/mHealth intervention integrated into the Dutch Alzheimer’s Association website and available from the App Store or Google Play, designed to help caregivers of people with dementia use their social network to better organize care and share positive (caregiving) experiences.

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Usability and Technology Use Studies with Elder Subjects

Web-based research allows cognitive psychologists to collect high-quality data from a diverse pool of participants with fewer resources. However, web-based testing presents unique challenges for researchers and clinicians working with aging populations. Older adults may be less familiar with computer usage than their younger peers, leading to differences in performance when completing web-based tasks in their home versus in the laboratory under the supervision of an experimenter.

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Falls Prevention in the Elderly

Wearable technology for fall alerts among older adult care recipients is one of the more frequently studied areas of technology, given the concerning consequences of falls among this population. Falls are quite prevalent in later life. While there is a growing amount of literature on older adults’ acceptance of technology, less is known about how caregivers’ attitudes toward technology can impact care recipients’ use of such technology.

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Aging with Chronic Disease

Assistive technologies for people with dementia and their relatives have the potential to ensure, improve, and facilitate home care and thereby enhance the health of the people caring or being cared for. The number and diversity of technologies and research have continuously increased over the past few decades. As a result, the research field has become complex.

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Viewpoints, Perspectives, Ideas on Aging

Worldwide, the population is aging rapidly; therefore, there is a growing interest in strategies to support and maintain health and well-being in later life. Although familiarity with technology and digital literacy are increasing among this group, some older adults still lack confidence in their ability to use web-based technologies. In addition, age-related changes in cognition, vision, hearing, and perception may be barriers to adoption and highlight the need for digital tools developed specifically to meet the unique needs of older adults.

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Osteoporosis and Osteoporosis Prevention

Management of osteoporosis is an important consideration for patients with femoral neck fractures due to the morbidity and mortality it poses. The input of orthogeriatric teams is invaluable in coordinating secondary fragility fracture prevention. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the rapid restructuring of health care teams and led to the redeployment of orthogeriatricians.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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