JMIR Aging

Digital health technologies, apps, and informatics for patient education, medicine and nursing, preventative interventions, and clinical care / home care for elderly populations

Editor-in-Chief:

Jing Wang, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, Dean and Professor, Florida State University College of Nursing, Tallahassee, FL, USA


JMIR Aging (JA, Founding Editor-in-chief: Jing Wang, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, Dean and Professor, Florida State University College of Nursing, Tallahassee, FL, USA) is an open access journal, focusing on technologies, medical devices, apps, engineering, informatics applications and patient education for medicine and nursing, education, preventative interventions and clinical care / home care for elderly populations. In addition, aging-focused big data analytics using data from electronic health record systems, health insurance databases, federal reimbursement databases (e.g. U.S. Medicare and Medicaid), and other large databases are also welcome.

This journal is read by clinicians, nurses/allied health professionals, informal caregivers and patients alike and have (as all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

JMIR Aging is indexed in PubMed Central (PMC), PubMed, and Scopus. Upon acceptance, an article processing fee will apply.

Recent Articles

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

The number of persons with dementia is steadily growing, as is the number of individuals supporting persons with dementia. Primary caregivers of persons with dementia are most often family members or spouses of the persons with dementia, and they are more likely to experience increased stress and other negative effects than individuals who are not primary caregivers. Although in-person support groups have been shown to help buffer the negative impacts of caregiving, some caregivers live in isolated or rural communities and are unable to make the burdensome commitment of traveling to cities. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we developed a mobile smartphone support app designed for primary caregivers of persons with dementia, with the goal of reducing caregiver burden and easing stress. The app features a 12-week intervention, largely rooted in mindfulness-based self-compassion (MBSC), because MBSC has been linked to minimizing stress, depression, and anxiety.

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Internet Access and Digital Technology Use in an Elderly Population

The rapid diffusion of the internet has decreased consumer reliance on health care providers for health information and facilitated the patients’ ability to be an agent in control of their own health. However, empirical evidence is limited regarding the effects of health-related internet use among older adults, which is complicated by the proliferation of online health and medical sources of questionable scientific accuracy.

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Internet Access and Digital Technology Use in an Elderly Population

Depression is common among homebound older adults. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) is a promising but understudied approach for treating depression among older adults with disabilities.

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Usability and Technology Use Studies with Elder Subjects

Advances in mobile technology and public needs have resulted in the emergence of mobile health (mHealth) services. Despite the potential benefits of mHealth apps, older adults face challenges and barriers in adopting them.

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Mobile Devices and Apps for Seniors and Healthy Aging

Promoting the health and well-being of couples where one partner has dementia is an overlooked area of care practice. Most postdiagnostic services currently lack a couple-centered approach and have a limited focus on the couple relationship. To help address this situation, we developed a tablet-based self-management guide (DemPower) focused on helping couples enhance their well-being and relationship quality.

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Physical Activity for Older People

Czech older adults have lower rates of physical activity than the average population and lag behind in the use of digital technologies, compared with their peers from other European countries.

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Mobile Devices and Apps for Seniors and Healthy Aging

Many people are motivated to self-track their health and optimize their well-being through mobile health apps and wearable devices. The diversity and complexity of these systems have evolved over time, resulting in a large amount of data referred to as patient-generated health data (PGHD), which has recently emerged as a useful set of data elements in health care systems around the world. Despite the increased interest in PGHD, clinicians and older adults’ perceptions of PGHD are poorly understood. In particular, although some clinician barriers to using PGHD have been identified, such as concerns about data quality, ease of use, reliability, privacy, and regulatory issues, little is known from the perspectives of older adults.

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Physical Activity for Older People

Research translating the evidence for the benefit of mind-body exercise in older Latinos with limited access to community-based healthy aging programs is sparse.

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Cognitive Training for the Elderly

Mobile health (mHealth) apps using novel visual mapping assistive technology can allow users to develop personalized maps that aid people living with cognitive impairment in the recall of steps needed to independently complete activities of daily living (ADLs), such as bathing, toileting, and dressing.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

The worldwide increase in community-dwelling people with dementia underscores the need for innovative eHealth technologies that aim to provide support to both patients and their informal caregivers in the home setting. However, sustainable implementation of eHealth technologies within this target group can be difficult.

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Reviews on Aging

The continuous growth of the older adult population will have implications for the organization of health and social care. Potentially, in-home monitoring unobtrusive sensing systems (USSs) can be used to support formal or informal caregivers of older adults, as they can monitor deviant physical and physiological behavior changes. Most existing USSs are not specific to older adult care. Hence, to facilitate the implementation of existing USSs in older adult care, it is important to know which USSs would be more suitable for older adults.

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Mental Health Issues in Elderly Patients and Geriatric Psychiatry

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the depression level among US adults has significantly increased. Age disparity in depression during the pandemic has been reported in recent studies. Delay or avoidance of medical care is one of the collateral damages associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, and it can lead to increased morbidity and mortality.

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