JMIR Aging

Using technological innovations and data science to inform and improve health care services and health outcomes for older adults.

Editor-in-Chief:

Yun Jiang, PhD, MS, RN, FAMIA, University of Michigan School of Nursing, USA; and Jinjiao Wang, PhD, RN, MPhil, University of Rochester, USA


Impact Factor 4.9

JMIR Aging is an open-access journal that focuses on digital health, emerging technologies, health informatics applications, and patient education for preventative care, clinical care, home care, and self-management support for older adults. The journal also covers aging-focused big data analytics using data from electronic health record systems, health insurance databases, federal reimbursement databases (e.g. U.S. Medicare and Medicaid), and other large datasets.

The target audience of JMIR Aging includes physicians, nurses, allied health professionals, advanced clinical practitioners, patients and caregivers. We publish original research, viewpoints, and reviews (both literature reviews and technology reviews). In 2023, JMIR Aging received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 4.9 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). JMIR Aging is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, Sherpa/Romeo, DOAJ, Scopus, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

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Health Services Research and Health Care Utilization in Older Patients

The occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic demanded fast changes in the delivery of healthcare. As a result, a significant growth in the use of telemedicine services occurred. Research, especially from nationally representative German samples, is needed to better understand determinants of telemedicine utilization.

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Viewpoints, Perspectives, Ideas on Aging

In this article, we will provide a rationale for an online delivered Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) approach to loneliness among older adults, drawing upon theories from the literature on adult development and aging, emotion regulation, and loneliness. Utilizing the principles of ACT, the intervention program was developed. ACT is a cognitive-behavioral approach and unified model of human behavior change and psychological growth. The ACT intervention focuses on developing nonjudgmental present-focused awareness of internal experiences (thoughts, emotions, and memories) through strategies such as acceptance and mindfulness rather than directly modifying or removing them per se. The ACT intervention appears well-suited to assist older adults in coping with the challenges of aging, as the focus is on an individual’s willingness to sit with internal experiences out of one’s control (i.e., acceptance), stepping back from negative or critical thoughts and developing greater kindness toward oneself (i.e., defusion), discerning what is most important to one’s true self (i.e., values), and building larger patterns of effective action based on such values (i.e., committed action). The ACT intervention was developed as a resource for older adults who are socially isolated or having difficulty with social connectedness. Eight modules comprise the online delivered ACT intervention program, which includes reading materials, video clips, and activities. Each module is followed by a summary/homework assignment, a short quiz to assess learning, and a moderated discussion with a coach. The intervention program begins with reconnecting participants with his or her values. The goal of the ACT intervention program is to foster flexibility in the participant’s behavior so they can behave consistently with their chosen values, rather than becoming locked into a pattern of behavior that is driven by avoiding distress or discomfort. The ACT intervention approach is both novel and innovative, as it is based on acceptance and commitment therapy and leveraged a behavioral health online platform that is flexible and inclusive in its design. The ACT intervention aims to help older adults become more socially connected, less lonely, and more satisfied with their relationships with other people. The emphasis that ACT places on values and living life in accordance with one’s values renders it an approach ideally suited to older adults. Finally, recommendations for future research regarding this approach to addressing loneliness among older adults is addressed.

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Cognitive Training for the Elderly

Asking questions is common in conversation, and while asking questions, we need to listen carefully to what others say and consider the perspective our questions adopt. However, difficulties remain in verifying its effect on older adults’ cognitive function owing to the lack of a standardized system to conduct experiments at participant’s homes.

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Usability and Technology Use Studies with Elder Subjects

There is a need to develop and coordinate dementia care plans that use assistive technology for vulnerable groups such as immigrant populations. However, immigrant populations are seldom included in various stages of the development and implementation of assistive technology, which does not optimize technology acceptance.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

The increasing prevalence of Alzheimer disease and Alzheimer disease–related dementia in the United States has amplified the health care burden and caregiving challenges, especially for caregivers of people living with dementia. A web-based care planning tool, Olera.care, was developed to aid caregivers in managing common challenges associated with dementia care.

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AI in Older Adult Care

Interventions and care that can evoke positive emotions and reduce apathy or agitation are important for people with dementia. In recent years, socially assistive robots used for better dementia care have been found to be feasible. However, the immediate responses of people with dementia when they are given multiple sensory modalities from socially assistive robots have not yet been sufficiently elucidated.

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Assisted Living for the Elderly and Nursing Home Care

Technology has been identified as a potential solution to alleviate resource gaps and augment care delivery in dementia care settings such as hospitals, long-term care, and retirement homes. There has been an increasing interest in using real-time location systems (RTLS) across health care settings for older adults with dementia, specifically related to the ability to track a person’s movement and location.

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Mental Health Issues in Elderly Patients and Geriatric Psychiatry

Sleep efficiency is often used as a measure of sleep quality. Getting sufficiently high-quality sleep has been associated with better cognitive function among older adults, however, the relationship between day-to-day sleep quality variability and cognition has not been well-established.

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Cognitive Training for the Elderly

Cognitive stimulation of older people helps to prevent, and even treat, age-related diseases, such as Mild Cognitive Impairment. Playing games reduces the probability of suffering from this pathology related to the loss of the ability to carry out some instrumental activities of daily living.

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Supporting Informal Care and Caregivers

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), as an empirically based third-wave cognitive behavioral therapy, has shown promise in enhancing well-being and functioning across diverse populations. However, in the context of caregiving, the effect size of available ACT interventions remains at best moderate, sometimes accompanied by high dropout rates, highlighting the need for more effective and feasible intervention designs.

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Information and Patient Education on Healthy Aging

The societal burden of cognitive impairments in China has prompted researchers to develop clinical prediction models aimed at making risk assessments that enable preventative interventions. However, it is unclear what types of risk factors best predict future cognitive impairment, if known risk factors make equally accurate predictions across different socioeconomic groups, and if existing prediction models are equally accurate across different subpopulations.

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